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Growing Young Lives: Past, Present and Future. March 28th 2022

On Monday 28th March, 1.00 - 2.00 pm, Young Lives will be holding a virtual showcase of our work, past, present and future.  

Location: Online, zoom meeting

What makes Young Lives such a special study?

Join our virtual event for a

  • snapshot of Young Lives and our
  • latest research findings on the impact of the pandemic on the young people in our study, 
  • recent methodological innovations
  • future research plans. 

 Registration to join the event can be accessed through Eventbrite here

Young Lives - a rich history of research to policy 

Over the last two decades, Young Lives has generated ground-breaking insights into the impact of childhood poverty and widening inequalities across a wide range of development outcomes. The breadth of data enables a holistic understanding of childhood development and transitions into adulthood and of how different aspects of life interconnect and change over time, such as how early malnutrition affects physical growth and early learning, with later impacts on education and employment opportunities.

Young Lives has an impressive track record of creating policy impact whether it be shifting the global debate on tackling undernutrition by demonstrating the potential to reverse early growth stunting even into adolescence; strengthening early learning policies in Ethiopia and Peru; influencing national polices to address child marriage in India; and promoting curriculum development in Vietnam to deliver ‘21st century skills’, such as problem solving and critical thinking.

Young Lives - Current challenges; intersecting inequalities and new vulnerabilities

Prior to the pandemic, Young Lives evidence showed that living standards across all four study countries had significantly improved, with young people substantially better off than their parents, despite persistent inequalities.  Findings from the second call in  ‘Listening to Young Lives at Work: COVID-19 Phone Survey’, revealed  that the ongoing economic and social impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic threaten to halt this progress

We have continued to track the impact of the pandemic through our phone survey and have now completed the fifth Call.  We will release the latest headline findings on March 9th. These will assess the impact of the on-going pandemic on multiple areas of young people's lives, including their education, employment, household income, food security, mental health and access to vaccines.

But COVID-19 is not the only global crisis. Young Lives evidence from Ethiopia reflects unprecedented times, as vulnerable young people grapple with the compounding effects of civil conflict, climate change, and COVID-19, including an alarming increase in food insecurity in the south-western regions, alongside the devastating impact of the Tigray conflict in the north.

Young Lives - looking ahead

The new vulnerabilities and intersecting inequalities being experienced by Young Lives participants are one of a number of areas of on-going and future research for the study.

Young Lives will be back in the field in 2023 to undertake the next in-person survey round with participants across the four country studies. This exciting new phase of research will explore issues including the impact of the pandemic on education and employment trajectories, physical and mental health, the important role that family plays in livelihood decisions, and the impact of gender and intersecting inequalities.

To find out more about Young Lives, join us on the 28th via the Eventbrite link above. For more information about the event, contact younglives@qeh.ox.ac.uk or follow us on Twitter @yloxford, Facebook or LinkedIn. 

Growing Young Lives: Past, Present and Future. March 28th 2022

On Monday 28th March, 1.00 - 2.00 pm, Young Lives will be holding a virtual showcase of our work, past, present and future.  

Location: Online, zoom meeting

What makes Young Lives such a special study?

Join our virtual event for a

  • snapshot of Young Lives and our
  • latest research findings on the impact of the pandemic on the young people in our study, 
  • recent methodological innovations
  • future research plans. 

 Registration to join the event can be accessed through Eventbrite here

Young Lives - a rich history of research to policy 

Over the last two decades, Young Lives has generated ground-breaking insights into the impact of childhood poverty and widening inequalities across a wide range of development outcomes. The breadth of data enables a holistic understanding of childhood development and transitions into adulthood and of how different aspects of life interconnect and change over time, such as how early malnutrition affects physical growth and early learning, with later impacts on education and employment opportunities.

Young Lives has an impressive track record of creating policy impact whether it be shifting the global debate on tackling undernutrition by demonstrating the potential to reverse early growth stunting even into adolescence; strengthening early learning policies in Ethiopia and Peru; influencing national polices to address child marriage in India; and promoting curriculum development in Vietnam to deliver ‘21st century skills’, such as problem solving and critical thinking.

Young Lives - Current challenges; intersecting inequalities and new vulnerabilities

Prior to the pandemic, Young Lives evidence showed that living standards across all four study countries had significantly improved, with young people substantially better off than their parents, despite persistent inequalities.  Findings from the second call in  ‘Listening to Young Lives at Work: COVID-19 Phone Survey’, revealed  that the ongoing economic and social impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic threaten to halt this progress

We have continued to track the impact of the pandemic through our phone survey and have now completed the fifth Call.  We will release the latest headline findings on March 9th. These will assess the impact of the on-going pandemic on multiple areas of young people's lives, including their education, employment, household income, food security, mental health and access to vaccines.

But COVID-19 is not the only global crisis. Young Lives evidence from Ethiopia reflects unprecedented times, as vulnerable young people grapple with the compounding effects of civil conflict, climate change, and COVID-19, including an alarming increase in food insecurity in the south-western regions, alongside the devastating impact of the Tigray conflict in the north.

Young Lives - looking ahead

The new vulnerabilities and intersecting inequalities being experienced by Young Lives participants are one of a number of areas of on-going and future research for the study.

Young Lives will be back in the field in 2023 to undertake the next in-person survey round with participants across the four country studies. This exciting new phase of research will explore issues including the impact of the pandemic on education and employment trajectories, physical and mental health, the important role that family plays in livelihood decisions, and the impact of gender and intersecting inequalities.

To find out more about Young Lives, join us on the 28th via the Eventbrite link above. For more information about the event, contact younglives@qeh.ox.ac.uk or follow us on Twitter @yloxford, Facebook or LinkedIn.