This site is not fully supported by Internet Explorer. To fully enjoy this website, please use an alternative browser

family playing football
About Ethiopia

Ethiopia had made good progress towards the Millennium Development Goals, compared to other Sub-Saharan countries, and is now working hard to meet the Sustainable Development Goals. In addition to an overall decline in poverty, and reductions in child mortality and the prevalence of HIV and AIDS, economic growth over the past two decades has brought an expansion of infrastructure and improved access to services such as health and education.

However, food security and under-nutrition persist. According to the 2021 Humanitarian Response Plan (HPR), an estimated 13.2 million people don't have enough to eat and since November 2020 internal war has had serious consequences.  Although the government is devoting a high share of its budget to pro-poor programs and investments,  COVID-19 and measures to deal with the pandemic have affected livelihoods and education, a recognised route out of poverty. There are signs that gains are being reversed and inequalities are beginning to widen, particularly between urban and rural areas, and the extent of impacts of recent conflict on the economy and livelihoods remains to be seen. Visit the Young Lives Ethiopia website to learn more, including the effects of COVID-19.  

“This crucial research from Young Lives explains why action is needed to get young people in developing countries safely back into education.”
- Alula Pankhurst
About Ethiopia

Ethiopia had made good progress towards the Millennium Development Goals, compared to other Sub-Saharan countries, and is now working hard to meet the Sustainable Development Goals. In addition to an overall decline in poverty, and reductions in child mortality and the prevalence of HIV and AIDS, economic growth over the past two decades has brought an expansion of infrastructure and improved access to services such as health and education.

However, food security and under-nutrition persist. According to the 2021 Humanitarian Response Plan (HPR), an estimated 13.2 million people don't have enough to eat and since November 2020 internal war has had serious consequences.  Although the government is devoting a high share of its budget to pro-poor programs and investments,  COVID-19 and measures to deal with the pandemic have affected livelihoods and education, a recognised route out of poverty. There are signs that gains are being reversed and inequalities are beginning to widen, particularly between urban and rural areas, and the extent of impacts of recent conflict on the economy and livelihoods remains to be seen. Visit the Young Lives Ethiopia website to learn more, including the effects of COVID-19.  

“This crucial research from Young Lives explains why action is needed to get young people in developing countries safely back into education.”
- Alula Pankhurst